​​​​​​AMY E. BROWN, MS, CAC, LPC, CCTP, SAP

CERTIFIED ADDICTIONS COUNSELOR 
Licensed Professional counselor
Certified  Clinical TRAUMA PROFESSIONAL
Certified DOT-SAP PRovider


​​​​ 780 East Market  Street #280
 West Chester, PA 19382

  c   610.416.0793
  f  610. 566.3274  ​​
  amyebrown.lpc@gmail.com

Living With ADHD- Tips to Help Kids Stay Organized and Follow Directions
National Institute of Mental Health

Schedule
Keep the same routine every day, from wake-up time to bedtime. Include time for homework, outdoor play, and indoor activities. Keep the schedule on the refrigerator or on a bulletin board in the kitchen. Write changes on the schedule as far in advance as possible.

Organize everyday items 
Have a place for everything, and keep everything in its place. This includes clothing, backpacks, and toys.

Use homework and notebook organizers
Use organizers for school material and supplies. Stress to your child the importance of writing down assignments and bringing home the necessary books.

Be clear and consistent
 Children with ADHD need consistent rules they can understand and follow.

Give praise or rewards when rules are followed
 Children with ADHD often receive and expect criticism. Look for good behavior, and praise it.

Some children with ADHD continue to have it as adults. And many adults who have the disorder don't know it. They may feel that it is impossible to get organized, stick to a job, or remember and keep appointments. Daily tasks such as getting up in the morning, preparing to leave the house for work, arriving at work on time, and being productive on the job can be especially challenging for adults with ADHD.

These adults may have a history of failure at school, problems at work, or difficult or failed relationships. Many have had multiple traffic accidents. Like teens, adults with ADHD may seem restless and may try to do several things at once, most of them unsuccessfully. They also tend to prefer "quick fixes," rather than taking the steps needed to achieve greater rewards.